Blick Love

Blick Art Supply has been a long time sponsor for my work. They provided their signature markers in 2011 so I could cover the yards and yards of wall in Week in Hell and recently they provided materials for the creation of the Shell Game Paintings.
I’m so, so grateful for their support!

Here are some tools I used to make Shell Game:

Princeton Short Handle Umbria Liner Brushes
Silver Brush Silverwhite Synthetic Long Handle Angular
Speedball Standard Pen Holders
Manga Nibs and Holder Set
Golden Acrylic Gesso
Golden Acrylic Medium
Faber-Castell Pitt Artist Pens (fineliner)
Faber-Castell Pitt Artist Pens (manga)
Faber-Castell Pitt Artist Pens (wallet)

Press for Shell Game

Now that Shell Game is over, and I’m emerging from post-art, post-party coma, I’m rounding up some of the frankly stellar press we got.

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…she often gets Hieronymus Bosch comparisons.

But if you showed most Bosch paintings to a small child, he or she would run away crying. They’re scary, and they’re supposed to be. Molly’s paintings, from a distance, are gorgeous and cheerful to look at; you often don’t realize they’re disturbing until you look closely. A child would look at one of her 6’x4’ paintings and spend all day staring at what looks like a fun story about balloon-wielding cats and police-force dogs and masked rabbits and little birds working on laptops, in Arabic no less. You’d have to be a grownup to realize the subjects of her giant, impassioned panoramas are dissident bloggers in Tunisia and the rise of rightist movements in Greece and the Occupy protests. To a kid, they’d just look like God’s very own circus posters, or a bunch of gorgeous, incomprehensible hieroglyphs whose only purpose was to be looked at.” “Molly Crabapple: Occupy’s Greatest Artist” by Matt Taibbi. Rolling Stone

…when her Occupy Wall Street images went worldwide, all that changed. Crabapple was suddenly both a graphic artist for the movement and an emblem of the way that art could break out of the gilded gallery. - New Republic

In 2011 people around the world broke consensus with power. They sat down in the main squares of their cities — Tahrir, Syntagma, Puerta del Sol, Zuccotti — and declared that the old machines were defunct. By 2012, the rebellions were partially crushed, or had mutated in ways their initial participants could never have imagined. It was a ferociously urgent year. Things, for the first time in a long time, felt like they might change — that a new world itself might be at the end of a street demonstration.
Wired

“Crabapple turns to the side and gestures to a painting: a ghostly, burlesque, open-armed muse with her body made of red, white, and blue balloons, floating above a fray of grinning and green-furred fat cats and innocent little mice. It’s beautiful, hilarious, and horrifying. – Fast Company

 Doing big, time-consuming art based around current events is a strange thing. As you create the work, the events you’re creating recede. The world moves so much faster then your paintbrush. The motion in these pieces is just as much about that—an attempt to show how ungraspable, how impossible to hammer down that year was. -American Reader

Saltz’s piece, interestingly enough, is illustrated with a photograph of Keith Haring’s 1982 opening at another downtown storefront art gallery. For all that Molly Crabapple wasn’t even born in 1982, the similarities are obvious: a flat, populist, all-over aesthetic with a real propensity to go viral; the gallery merely one part of a much broader cultural attack. - Reuters

Like the works of James Ensor or Georg Scholz, “Shell Game” goes beyond the political cartoon, using the historic genre as a jumping off point to launch into a series of epic allegorical paintings, rife with hidden meanings, dualities and symbolism. - ArtSlant

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Other show coverage:

Bust
DNAInfo
Feministe
BlackBook
Huffington Post
BusinessNews Insider

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And featuring our show:

Stoya steps into the tub and swims in a mass of green gauze ribbons and play money printed by Crabapple herself. Crabapple’s $10,000 large-scale paintings of 2011′s political uprisings surround her; a rented bodyguard named Mike watches nearby. As Stoya poses in the tub, a throng of Occupy activists, lefty journalists, Jezebel bloggers, and burlesque stars in blue latex take turns snapping Instagram shots with her. The stench of marijuana wafts across the gallery. The windows around the tub steam up. “This is the New York I was promised,” Stoya says outside in her fur and heels, lighting one more Parliament. – Village Voice: Stoya, Pop Star of Porn

Shell Game opens Sunday, April 14th!

MOLLY_CRABAPPLE_POSTER_MARCH4

The paintings have been moved into the space & Shell Game is almost ready to be unveiled! Please join me on Sunday, April 14th for the public opening at Smart Clothes Gallery in Manhattan from 7-10pm. All 9 finished paintings, 9 watercolours and the Wheel of Fortune will be on display, thanks to the funding of 701 amazing and wonderful Kickstarter backers. The opening will also feature free hard cider and beer from Original Sin and Brooklyn Brewery!

Smart Clothes Gallery
154 Stanton Street, at the corner of Suffolk
New York, NY 10002
Opening runs from 7-10pm

Press on the show:

BlackBook: New Exhibitions: Molly Crabapple’s ‘Shell Game’
Huffington Post: Molly Crabapple’s ‘Shell Game’ Paintings Depict A Year In Crisis From Occupy Wall Street To Anonymous Hacks
Wired: Shell Game Illustrates Occupy and the Revolutions of 2011
Animal: Crises and Revolutions: Molly Crabapple’s Complete “Shell Game”
BlogTalkRadio: A Conversation with Molly Crabapple
Conversation with Paul Mason (video)

Thanks to our sponsors, Blick Art MaterialsOriginal Sin Hard Cider, Brooklyn Brewery, and Bombay Sapphire!

brooklyn-logoyea  
Win!

Shell Game in Wired Magazine

The Hivemind

 

In 2011 people around the world broke consensus with power. They sat down in the main squares of their cities — Tahrir, Syntagma, Puerta del Sol, Zuccotti — and declared that the old machines were defunct. By 2012, the rebellions were partially crushed, or had mutated in ways their initial participants could never have imagined. It was a ferociously urgent year. Things, for the first time in a long time, felt like they might change — that a new world itself might be at the end of a street demonstration.

-Molly Crabapple

Shell Game Illustrates Occupy and the Revolutions of 2011 - an interview with Molly Crabapple on Wired.com

Bradley Manning Art Print Auction

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I’m running an auction for this portrait of Private Bradley E. Manning, created for the April 5,  2013 event at Judson Memorial Church, NYC.

17″ x 22″ giclée print on 100% cotton rag archival paper. Limited edition of 200.

The auction will run through April 5 or until 200 bids are received.

Minimum bid is $100. The 200 highest / first bids will receive a poster.

100% of proceeds will benefit the Bradley Manning Defense Fund.

Bid now at https://www.wepay.com/donations/bradley-manning-art-print-auction

The Paris Review – Diego, Frida & Me

 

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I’ve done several murals. Mural work is art at its most blue collar and most sublime: half carpentry and half metaphysics. You’re exhausted and filthy,  wobbling on a rickety platform, but you’re creating a world. Anyone who enters a room you’ve painted does it on your terms. When I do murals, I feel as if I’m John Henry, racing the steam engine through a mountain. If I will die, it will be with a paintbrush in my hand.

Last year I started doing giant paintings about the revolutions of 2011. I was inspired by Diego Rivera.

-Molly Crabapple for the Paris Review - “Diego, Frida and Me”

Hacking the Crowd at SXSW

Molly Crabapple – visual artist, and Kim Boekbinder – musician, are both champions of the crowd funding age. Both have received international praise and recognition for their groundbreaking work in their respective mediums, as well as the way they run their careers. Though they work in different fields what the two have in common is that they have both built their careers on their own: no management, booking, labels, or galleries of any kind have made possible what they do. Yet they both make a living as full time artists in a world where we are told that fewer and fewer people are paying for music and art.

Molly Crabapple discusses circumventing the rigid gallery system which favors the sale of large and expensive works of art over the quick, passionate, and current work of such a prolific artist.

Kim Boekbinder brings to the table her groundbreaking pre-sold tour concept and the successes and pitfalls of an artist in close contact with her audience.

Hacking the Crowd: Artists as Entrepreneurs
Hyatt Regency Austin
Texas Ballroom 5-7
208 Barton Springs Road, Austin, TX
Sunday, March 10th, 11am – 12pm

Coming to London

The Story
Conway Hall
25 Red Lion Square, London, WC1R 4RL
Friday, February 22, 2013
Event runs 10am-4pm

I go on at 12:00pm. I’m going to talk about art and politics.

London School of Economics
Women Writing History @ LSE and Gender Institute Literary Festival
Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building
The London School of Economics and Political Science, Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE
Wednesday, February 27, 2013
1-2:30pm

I’ll be speaking about Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, and ideas about men’s and women’s art. Free, but you have to reserve tickets online

Speaking at CUNY Grad Center

Has the successful transmission of images become essential to engaging in and sustaining dissent? In our mediatized world, issues of visual representation lie increasingly at the center of the social movements. Join illustrators Peter Kuper and Molly Crabapple in discussion with comic-book scholar Jonathan W. Gray about the politics of representing dissent from Oaxaca to Greece to Occupy to the Gaza Strip.

Representing Dissent: Political Movements and Graphic Narrative
CUNY Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue
The Skylight Room (9100)
New York, NY
Friday, February 15th @ 6:00 pm

New Monthly Column for Vice

<br /><br />
The old world&#8217;s machines are breaking. In 2011, millions noticed:  in Spain and Greece and New York and Cairo, they sat down in public squares, and said the machine was defunct. Those squares are empty today. Spain&#8217;s protest movements are now doing the slow work of building spaces to help each other, while the world decides what it&#8217;s going to become. <br /><br />
- Seville&#8217;s Squatters: No Light, No Water, No Fear</p><br />
<p>Now might be a good time to say that I&#8217;ll be doing a monthly illustrated column for Vice

The old world’s machines are breaking. In 2011, millions noticed:  in Spain and Greece and New York and Cairo, they sat down in public squares, and said the machine was defunct. Those squares are empty today. Spain’s protest movements are now doing the slow work of building spaces to help each other, while the world decides what it’s going to become.

Now might be a good time to say that I’ll be doing a monthly illustrated column for Vice

Ariadne and the Science 4/5

But what Ariadne discovered on her walks with the Meadow was that there were bigger places to see.  The multiverse hangs in the metaverse, a room where all the universes hang like sheets on a great hypermagnetic wave.  And the Xenoverse is the weather outside that room that causes the wave.  And the Hyperverse is the weather system that causes those winds.  And the Hyperverse is the impossibly giant ecology that contains all things.  Ariadne, of course, knew as well as you and I that weeds get bloody everywhere. So it was not an impossibly long time before she, in a boat of Meadow, could look down on all of creation and know that everything everywhere was really nothing more than things growing.  And she, no less than a clever woman who never learned not to ask questions, did look down, and smiled.

Words by Warren Ellis, pictures by Molly Crabapple.

ARIADNE 4/5 is available as a limited-edition print.

© Warren Ellis & Molly Crabapple 2012

#ariadnescience

1 – 2 – 3 – 4 -5

Complete Molly Crabapple Gift Guide

The giant wrap-up of things I’ve made that you can buy for the holidays.  The last day to order in order to get things for Christmas is 12/15.

Original Commissions

Have Molly Crabapple do a custom portrait illustration for you! Your original artwork will be drawn on 13 x 19″ stained art paper with pen, ink, gouache and dye. It will be in a similar style to the image listed. Please be prepared to send one or two photos that clearly shows the subject’s face within 5 days of commission purchase. Limited to ten portraits, guaranteed delivery by the holidays with timely delivery of photographs.

Order A Commission here

Silkscreen of the Month

For 2013, Molly Crabapple will produce one limited edition 8×12″ (paper size) silkscreen per month. You can purchase the full year’s worth of silkscreens, which will be released on the first of every month & mailed to you. If you order the year in advance, you will also receive a hand made portfolio case to store your artwork in, emblazoned with the “Art of Molly Crabapple” logo.

+ Subcribe to Silkscreen of the Month here

Ariadne and the Science

My art/flash fiction collaboration with Warren Ellis. Buy the first three prints here

Prints


Giclees and serigraphs this way.

I Have Your Heart Merch

Limited edition t-shirts and DVD’s from our insane paper puppet animation


Books



Discordia: Six Nights in Crisis Athens
 



Devil in the Details



Week in Hell

Rubber Bullets on the Streets of Madrid

A few weeks ago, I went to Madrid for the general strike, where I swigged whisky, watched teenage anarchists smash banks, and drew mass protests.  I wrote and sketched it for VICE.

 

Of course, protest doesn’t change the world. By itself, protest is carnival. Masquerade, song, fire- liaisons made and kings mocked. Daily gray briefly overturned.  Rebellious ecstasy that ultimately serves to keep the hierarchy in place. Those in power, if they’re a speck self aware, allow carnival as a safety valve. Carnival is not power itself.