Show Me The Money

Show Me The Money: The Image of Finance, 1700 to the Present

The latest film from the AHRC looks at ‘Show Me The Money’ – a new exhibition which charts how the financial world has been imagined in art, illustration, photography and other visual media over the last three centuries in Britain and the United States.

This exhibition asks what does ‘the market’ look like? What does money really stand for? How can the abstractions of high finance be made visible? The project asks how artists have grappled with the increasingly intangible nature of money and finance, from the South Sea Bubble of the eighteenth century to the global financial crisis of 2008.

This AHRC film guides us through the exhibition featuring works ranging from satirical eighteenth-century prints by William Hogarth to newly commissioned works by artists Cornford & Cross, and James O Jenkins, as well as the first UK exhibition of international artist such Molly Crabapple.

The exhibition includes an array of media: paintings, prints, photographs, videos, artefacts, and instruments of financial exchange both ‘real’ and imagined. Indeed the exhibition also charts the development of an array of financial visualisations, including stock tickers and charts, newspaper illustrations, bank adverts, and electronic trading systems.

To find out more about Show Me The Money please visit the www.imageoffinance.com, website for information, interactive games, and more.

 

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