Monthly Archives: December 2017

Sneak Preview of Vogue India Book

Molly is featured in Vogue India’s upcoming publication. Here’s a sneak preview:

Frida never denied pain. Instead, with her art, she looked it frankly in the eye, and said, yeah, I see you, you ugly beast. You think you’re all powerful, but you’re just my raw material, same as my brushes. I’ll polish you and paint you, and make you serve me. You’ll be my most beautiful weapon of all.

Full article here: https://www.vogue.in/content/excerpt-from-dress-an-anthology-celebrating-clothing-style-vogue-india-book/ (note: requires member login)

Puerto Rico Sketchbook: The Comic Book Artist

The next entry in Molly’s series with the Paris Review is live.

The text in the drawing reads: “They say these people at El Local aren’t ‘Puerto Rican’ but this is what Puerto Rico looks like to me”.

“Before Hurricane María it was kind of hard to be an artist in Puerto Rico and now it’s almost impossible,” she continued. “Our art scene thrived on ‘underground’ cultural spaces and galleries willing to give a chance on nontraditional art. Now those spaces are closed, inaccessible or like El Local, repurposed for worthier causes. I have no doubt these spaces will be open once more, but it might be too late.

Full article here: https://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2017/12/22/puerto-rico-sketchbook-comic-book-artist/

Puerto Rico Sketchbook: The Houses Still Standing

The next entry in Molly’s Puerto Rico Sketchbook for the Paris Review is live.

Puerto Rico was colonized before the United States, and by the time U.S. gunboats boomed into its harbor in 1898, it had enjoyed its hard-won autonomy from Spain for several months—not that this helped the island in the eyes of its new overlords. In the opinion of many U.S. politicians, Puerto Rico was populated by members of the deficient “Spanish” race, too lazy and primitive to be granted either independence or statehood. How little some attitudes change.

Full article available here: https://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2017/12/20/puerto-rico-sketchbook-houses-still-standing/

Puerto Rico Sketchbook: There Are Dead in the Fields

Molly’s next entry in her Sketchbooks from Puerto Rico series with the Paris Review, There Are Dead in the Fields, is up now.

Sugeily, Rocio, and Augustin sang together now, tenderness replacing the mockery in their voices, and the crowd joined them. Fuerte fuerte como hacha y machete. Strong, strong, like machete and axe. When the last chorus finally ended, the whole cantastoria had lasted only five minutes, but it felt far longer, and hit far deeper, too. 

Full article and illustrations here: https://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2017/12/18/puerto-rico-sketchbook-dead-fields/

 

Greeting Cards to Support the Karam Foundation

These greeting cards feature reproductions of murals Molly painted at the Karam House this past year. This is the first time the paintings have been reproduced in any print form. Each card includes an English translation of the individual’s quote and a short biography. The collections also include a blank envelope for each greeting card.

The Karam House is a community innovation workspace where Syrian refugee youth turn their passions and ideas into realities. It is a place where they can build strong relationships with peers and mentors. It is a place where they can learn competitive skills in science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics that are essential to advancing their educations and futures. Most of all, Karam House is an inspiring, safe, and healing space for Syrian teenagers – who have lost so much through the trauma of displacement and war – to be teenagers.

Cards and more information about the Karam Foundation are available here: https://www.karamfoundation.org/karam-gear/innovative-leaders-greeting-cards-limited-edition

 

Illustrations, Graphic Journalism Create Alternative Narratives and Historical Documents

American illustrator Molly Crabapple’s Scenes from Syria, published in 2015, is the result of a remarkable collaboration and a vivid exchange undertaken clandestinely in 2013 between her in New York, and Syrian journalist Marwan Hisham, in his native Raqqa. The duo later worked on Aleppo and Mosul and is putting together an 82-page memoir about their work, to be published in 2018. According to Hisham, “more subjects, such as refuge and the idea of homeland, will be included.”

“Our first collaboration was about Raqqa,” Hisham, now based in Turkey, recalled. “Molly (at the time a Twitter acquaintance) suggested if I can take photos that give an idea about the general life in the city under ISIS occupation. The idea, we both knew, was risky but was also very tempting. We agreed to make up to ten illustrations. Since it was my city, I knew exactly where to go, and in some cases, what to capture. We were in daily contact exchanging ideas. Molly ended up drawing all my photos of nine scenes. We had one thing in mind: Depicting civilian and human life in Raqqa and other cities away from stereotype.”

Full article here: http://www.syriauntold.com/en/2017/12/illustrations-graphic-journalism-create-alternative-narratives-historical-documents/

VICE: Dystopian Sketches From Inside the Inauguration Protesters’ Trial

During the #J20 protests, a small group of demonstrators smashed the windows of Starbucks and Bank of America, spray-painted cars, and overturned several newspaper boxes. Importantly, the prosecution has made no attempt to claim that the defendants were among them. Assistant U.S. Attorney Jennifer Kerkhoff has instead argued that the defendants were “playing a role” in the violence. That’s right: The government is trying to set the precedent that if you’re at a protest and someone else smashes a window, it’s your fault.

See full article here: https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/9kdb3a/dystopian-sketches-from-inside-the-inauguration-protesters-trial

The Paris Review – Puerto Rico Sketchbook: The Artists with the Shovels

Yet these artists had done something that neither Puerto Rico’s neglectful colonial overlords nor its governor had bothered to try. After the hurricane hit, they loaded their cars with donations from Defend PR and the Puerto Rican diaspora and drove into the mountains, determined to find out what people needed.

Read full article here: https://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2017/12/04/puerto-rico-sketchbook-artists-shovels/