Category Archives: Art

New reviews, and a new way to buy the book and help Syrians!

This week The Cairo Review of Global Affairs described Brothers of the Gun as “an indispensable read that features how ordinary youths change, adapt, and resist, in different forms, in the face of unceasing injustices”. And “a story of hope, fear, devastation, uncertainty, and bravery told through a concise and personal narrative. It is an essential read for anyone who seeks to understand what Raqqa has endured”.

Former US Marine Dewaine Farrina reviewed Brothers of the Gun for The Mantle .He gave an eloquent description of his time in Syria, before and after Arab Spring, and his impressions of the book. Describing Molly as “one of the most influential visual artists of our time” and saying that “(Marwan) demonstrates courage in every sense of the word”. Check out his wonderful piece Sea Stories and Memoirs: A Review of Brothers of the Gun.

There’s also a new way to buy Brothers of the Gun that directly helps Syrians in need…

Buy Brothers of the Gun through the Karam Foundation

The Karam Foundation is a non-profit that began in Chicago in 2007 that provides aid to Syrian refugees. They create education and entrepreneurial opportunities, as well as give direct emergency assistance to recently relocated Syrians. You may remember them from the murals Molly painted at Karam House and in schools in Reyhanli, Turkey in 2015. 

Right now you can buy your copy of Brothers of the Gun directly from the Karam Foundation where proceeds will benefit Syrians in need. While you’re there check out some of the other amazing books about Syria that they carry. Or pick up a set of the Innovative Leaders” series of greeting cards, illustrated by Molly!

Visit KaramFoundation.org to learn more about the incredible work they do.

Jeel School Mural

Molly again participated in Zeitouna, a program aimed at aiding and inspiring the youngest victims of the Syrian crisis. Alongside other mentors, she returned to Reyhanli, Turkey to paint murals for the Jeel School for Syrian refugee children.

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Like these? Consider donating to Karam Foundation, a grassroots organization working on both sides of the border.

Portrait in the 21st Century

Portrait in the Twenty-First Century
November 29, 2014 – January 17, 2015
54 Franklin Street
New York, NY 10013

Presented by Postmasters and featuring artwork by Molly Crabapple, Kristin Lucas, Katarzyna Kozyra, Sally Smart, Shamus Clisset, Austin Lee, Anton Perich, and Ryder Ripps. More info here.

Show Me the Money

Show Me the Money: The Image of Finance: 1700 to the Present, John Hansard Gallery, 2014. Featuring the original painting “Debt and her Debtors” in a group show. Photographs: Stephen Shrimpton

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Groundswell Art Auction Benefit

Bidding for Groundswell’s Annual Art Auction is now live! Featuring Molly’s signed 2014 self portrait, which you can bid on here. Bidding ends the day of the benefit, October 14th. For more information and to purchase tickets to the event, click here.

Groundswell Annual Art Auction Benefit
110 East 25th Street
New York, NY 10010
October 14, 2014, 7-10 pm

Salam School Mural Photos

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Had the great honor of being asked to come along with Zeitouna, a program by the Karam Foundation, to mentor displaced Syrian kids. A few dozen of us came to the Salam School, a school in Southeast Turkey for refugees. Dentists from the Syrian American Medical Society fixed hundreds of kids teeth. Boxers taught little girls to kickbox, and my friend Lina Sergie introduced the kids to the fundaments of architecture. I drew these murals.

The teachers, refugees themselves, were brilliant and inspiring. I’m shy and not particularly great with kids, and my Arabic has faded to a few sentences. But the kids loved watching me draw cats and mice up to no good all over the walls.

Photos by Mohamad Ojjeh.

Shell Game: CreativeCommons release

My first major solo show, SHELL GAME, closed last Tuesday.

Shell Game was covered by the New Republic, Rolling Stone, Fast Company, Wired, Reuters, the American Reader and many more. The openings were attended by hundreds of people –– many of whom, through their support of Shell Game’s kickstarter, made this whole project possible.

I’m starting to think about my next project, which will explore ideas of explicitly digital culture and privacy. I may even work with an institution or cultural organization to bring it to life on the largest scale possible.

Without the support of hundreds of people online, Shell Game would never have happened. The internet believed in me, believed in the promise of my art, and showed that in concrete ways.

The internet gave me Shell Game.

I want to give them something back.

Today is May Day. The day of workers, immigrants, beautiful young girls, and rebellion. I’m releasing all the art from SHELL GAME on Creative Commons. Share. Remix. Make art. Wheatpaste the world.

Click each image to see it in high resolution. Non-commercial use only and attribution is mandatory (see CreativeCommons below).

 

 

The Business of Illness

 

 

Creative Commons License
Shell Game by Molly Crabapple is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at https://mollycrabapple.com/2013/05/01/shell-game-hi-res/.

Scabby the Rat

“Scabby the Rat is popular art at its best. He’s the mean, funny, fiercely alive counterpart to all New York’s anodyne corporate sculpture.”

Sarah Jaffe and I created a tribute to Scabby the Rat. See him outside a non-union building site near you.

I Wrote for Vice

A woman’s beauty is supposed to be her grand project and constant insecurity. We’re meant to shellac our lips with five different glosses, but always think we’re fat. Beauty is Zeno’s paradox. We should endlessly strive for it, but it’s not socially acceptable to admit we’re there. We can’t perceive it in ourselves. It belongs to the guy screaming “nice tits.”

 

Saying “I’m beautiful,” let alone charging for it, breaks the rules.

 

The World of a Professional Naked Girl.  VICE

I wrote an article about my time as a naked model for VICE. It was hard as drawing blood to do, but it had been a long time coming.